Dog dog with tick shutterstock 222021178

Dog ticks are quite a common pet infestation among dogs. They can get these parasites anywhere, be it inside your house or when you roam around the park. There are various dog ticks treatment options that you can do to eradicate these nasty fleas from your dog's fur and skin.

One popular dog ticks treatment is the use of herbs and creams. You can also use anti-tick powders and oils especially made for canines suffering from ticks. However, though creams and lotions can kill ticks, they don't have the capacity to totally eradicate them. In fact, dead fleas end up still attached to your dog's fur.

Never attempt to remove dog ticks using tweezers. This is such a bad ticks removal practice that can cause infections and worsen the problem. Tweezers may burst the tick's body, poisoning your dog even more. If you're not aware of, there are specific dog ticks that can cause blood poisoning.

The safest dog ticks removal method to get rid of these parasites is by using your own hands. When you're doing that, remember not to put too much pressure on the ticks as their body could suddenly burst. You must do it carefully. The process of dog ticks removal might be a little painful for your pet. Once the dog ticks are out, you can dispose them by crushing them using newspapers. You can also put the ticks on a bowl filled with shampoo or bleach and flush them in the toilet bowl.

You can also opt for natural dog ticks treatment options. There are natural dog tick repellents that are proven to be effective in removing parasites that you can buy in the market today. You also can use garlic and vinegar to kill ticks. Simply add these natural ingredients in your pet's drinking water.

For severe cases of dog tick infestation, veterinarians usually recommend topical and oral medicines and antibiotics to administer your k9.

 

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