unleash-magazine-dog-escaping

Here's Today's Joke: Why did the Dachshund bite the woman's ankle?
Because he couldn't reach any higher.

No owner likes to get a call from the pound telling them that their dog has been picked up for roaming the streets, but even the best trained dog can escape and end up in places where it shouldn't be.

In many towns you can find yourself in legal trouble if your dog is found to be wandering the streets.
And quite rightly so as a dog on the loose can do quite a lot of damage to other people's property, pets, children and elderly folk.

Dogs that generally try to escape from their property are usually those that have not been trained or are bored.

Boredom is most often the case, and giving your dog suitable stimulation to ensure that he/she remains contented on the property can prevent this. This can be as simple as leaving toys for your dog to play with, fresh water and a suitable place to sleep, shelter from the weather, and anything else that the dog might need while you aren't in attendance. Obviously a big fence and a locked gate will go a long way to deter your dog from escaping.

Consider the alternative of trying to catch your dog once it has escaped, and the damage that can be done, should it run out in front of a cyclist or a car.
Prevention is always best.

Giving your dog regular exercise will also reduce the likelihood of it wanting to escape.
Even the fact that the dog knows it will be getting exercise when you arrive home will eliminate much of the possibility of having it escape during the time when you're away.

If your dog gets this exercise before you go out you are less likely to have problems because it is more likely to sleep after having exercised.

Photo Credits: The Inspiration Room

Health

  • Not Your Average Balm!

    Not Your Average Balm! So, Bulldogges. For those of you who call one “family” you know what I'm talking about! Skin: Itchy, scratchy and Read More
  • Myth: “If Your Dog Is Dragging Himself On His Rear, Then He Has Worms”

    Myth: “If Your Dog Is Dragging Himself On His Rear, Then He Has Worms” Actually, this one has a little truth to it and is not entirely a myth. A dog scoots on his Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
  • 53
  • 54
  • 55
  • 56
  • 57